News

  • Controlled Digital Lending Takes Center Stage at Library Leaders Forum by Caralee Adams, October 31, 2019. As enthusiasm grows for making library collections more accessible, the Internet Archive hosted an event to build a community of practice around Controlled Digital Lending (CDL). A diverse group gathered for the 2019 Library Leaders Forum Oct. 23 to share stories and strategies for libraries to expand their reach by lending out digital books based on their physical collections.
  • Weaving Books Into the Web - Starting With Wikipedia by Brewster Kahle, October 29, 2019. The Internet Archive has transformed 130,000 references to books in Wikipedia into live links to 50,000 digitized Internet Archive books in several Wikipedia language editions including English, Greek, and Arabic. And we are just getting started. By working with Wikipedia communities and scanning more books, both users and robots will link many more book references directly into Internet Archive books. In these cases, diving deeper into a subject will be a single click.
  • Unlocking the Potential for Every High School Library: 2019 Internet Archive Hero Award by Lila Bailey, October 23, 2019. Announced today, Phillips Academy has received the Hero Award from the Internet Archive for its leadership in adopting controlled digital lending for school libraries. The Hero Award is presented annually to an organization that exhibits leadership in making its holdings available to digital learners all over the world, and when Phillips Academy was renovating its Oliver Wendell Holmes Library, librarian Michael Barker wanted to update more than the physical space. This was also an opportunity to bring the private preparatory high school up to speed digitally – and in the process, share its vast book collection with others.
  • Everyone Deserves to Learn by Lila Bailey, October 22, 2019. The nation’s K-12 school libraries are hurting. Although the student population is rising in many districts, the number of librarians and media specialists dropped by nearly 20 percent from 2000 to 2015. Budgets are being reduced and some schools are no longer able to afford their school librarians, or are simply closing their libraries altogether. The cuts are particularly deep in underserved communities.
  • Closing the Access Gap in Rural Maryland by Lila Bailey, October 08, 2019. In southern Maryland, St. Mary’s County is 54 miles long and there are only three libraries. “We have people living at one end who might be 25 miles away from a branch,” said Michael Blackwell, Director of the St. Mary’s County Library that operates in the small communities of Leonardtown, Charlotte Hall and Lexington Park.
  • Protecting Unique Canadiana Works by Lila Bailey, October 03, 2019. Technology is enabling libraries in Canada to promote diversity, safeguard historic documents, and expand access — all while helping to save the planet. The Hamilton Public Library in the Canadian province of Ontario has nearly two dozen branches. Providing digital content to users in geographically remote areas is one of many reasons that the library has recently embraced Controlled Digital Lending, the digital equivalent of traditional library lending.
  • Academic Authors Find A Larger Audience by Lila Bailey, October 02, 2019. For Robert Darnton, the benefit of Controlled Digital Lending to academic authors is obvious: More people can read their work.
  • Unlocking Marooned Assets Through Digitization by Lila Bailey, September 26, 2019. Being able to lend an array of materials is fundamental to what public libraries do and Controlled Digital Lending–the digital equivalent of traditional library lending– is another tool for libraries to fulfill that mission, according to John Chrastka, executive director of EveryLibrary, a national organization dedicated to building voter support for libraries.
  • University of Alberta Opens Up Digital Access to Historic Curriculum Materials by Lila Bailey, September 24, 2019. Anyone interested in learning about what was taught in Alberta schools in the past century used to go to the basement of the H. T. Coutts Education and Kinesiology and Physical Education Library at the University of Alberta. There, users would ask to be let into a locked room to view the historical curriculum collection. Now, many of the historic textbooks are online and available through Controlled Digital Lending, the digital equivalent of a traditional library lending. It’s making for a new chapter in educational research at the urban university, which has about 40,000 students.
  • Giving New Life to Out-of-Print Books Through Controlled Digital Lending by Lila Bailey, September 19, 2019. Dean Bartoli Smith’s book of poetry about growing up in Baltimore came out in 2000. American Boy was long past its sales life until it was resurrected by being digitized by the Internet Archive and made available through one-at-a-time digital lending (a model known as Controlled Digital Lending).
  • Boston Public Library Leads Once Again in Digital Lending by Lila Bailey, September 10, 2019. By continuing to find new opportunities to make older books, often lost or just inaccessible to the public, available online, Boston Public Library is sparking new enthusiasm among the reading public.
  • Libraries Ensure That Our Future Is Connected and Informed. Let’s Help Them Keep It That Way. by Dylan Gilbert, September 06, 2019. It should go without saying, but it’s worth shouting from the rooftops every now and then: Libraries are important! While all libraries, from the largest city libraries to the smallest local libraries, provide a diverse array of vital community services, perhaps their most important role is to preserve culturally and historically valuable works and to provide their communities with access to those works. Delivering many of these services has proven to be a challenge for libraries in the 21st century, now that our lives are fully entangled with the internet and access to knowledge happens through digital technologies like electronic books (eBooks).
  • MIT Press Embraces New Access Models to Fulfill Mission by Lila Bailey, September 04, 2019. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Press was the first university press to sign an agreement with the Internet Archive to scan older print books for which it had no digital copies to make them available for one-at-a-time lending, a model known as Controlled Digital Lending.
  • Protecting Books From Harm With Controlled Digital Lending by Lila Bailey, August 28, 2019. Michelle Wu began working at the University of Houston Law Library in the wake of flooding from Tropical Storm Allison in 2001.
  • Helping Libraries Transform their Physical Collections by Chris Freeland, August 20, 2019. This is the first in a series of blog posts highlighting how libraries and publishers are addressing the challenges of providing digital access to materials in their print collections.
  • Librarians Share Benefits of Controlled Digital Lending by Lila Bailey, August 08, 2019. This summer, representatives from the Internet Archive joined librarians and advocates in Washington D.C., to talk with policymakers about how Controlled Digital Lending, or CDL, helps their communities.
  • Most 20th Century Books Unavailable to Internet Users – We Can Fix That by Brewster Kahle, July 01, 2019. The books of the 20th century are largely not online. They are mostly not available from even the biggest booksellers.
  • What Controlled Digital Lending does to Make Every Book Available Online When the book is out of print AND unavailable online why can’t your library scan it? by EveryLibrary, June 16, 2019. Sometimes, one of the more frustrating things about being a reader is that not every title you want is available in an electronic format. This is especially for books from the 20th century which were published before the “digital era”. It’s a funny reason why. When e-books first became commercially available in the 2000s, many authors, fearing that their book sales would be undermined by copies being distributed over the internet, chose not to make their works available in electronic form. If you have ever wanted to read a book that was out of print or difficult to find — even online — then you might be interested in a new concept that libraries are exploring called Controlled Digital Lending.
  • Controlled Digital Lending: Saving the Works of the 20th Century, Promoting Greater Access by Stan Adams, April 12, 2019. Before the rise of the internet, people looked for information in print. Often, preliminary research began with an encyclopedia, leading to more in-depth research among the shelves in a library. This exercise can be a rewarding experience, (if you haven’t tried it, it will give you perspective), but digital formats and telecommunication technology have dramatically improved the process, in terms of speed and convenience. They have also greatly helped people with disabilities, by enhancing their access to information. However, most of these improvements depend on the availability of digital versions of books and other works. Under a relatively new system called Controlled Digital Lending or CDL, both preservation of and access to libraries’ collections can be improved, and CDT hopes more libraries will adopt it.
  • Fair Use Week 2019: Day Five With Guest Expert David R. Hansen and Kyle K. Courtney by Kyle K. Courtney and David R. Hansen, March 01, 2019. One of the beautiful things about fair use is how it can soften the copyright act, which is in many ways highly structured and rigid, to provide flexibility for new, innovative technology.
  • Controlled Digital Lending by Adrian Sheppard, February 06, 2019. Eric Enno Tamm, Chair of The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC), calls it “an outrageous trespass on the rights of authors.” The UK’s Society of Authors is asking for help to “tackle e-book piracy,” and TWUC Executive Director John Degen states that “the harm this does to the e-book market, and to genuine library sales, is incalculable.” The target of all this extreme rhetoric is the Internet Archive’s Open Library and its use of Controlled Digital Lending. The concerns raised are of particular interest to the University of Alberta, where the University of Alberta Libraries has recently made its previously non-circulating Wiedrick collection accessible via Controlled Digital Lending through the Internet Archive.
  • Controlled Digital Lending: an Interview with Jonathan Band by Jonathan Band, January 22, 2019. The concept of controlled digital lending is receiving growing attention. Originating in the United States, it is now a subject of discussion elsewhere in the world, raising both interest and concern. IFLA has interviewed Jonathan Band, a member of the Libraries Copyright Alliance, to find out more.
  • Lessons from the ReDigi decision by Kevin Smith, January 17, 2019. The decision announced last month in the ReDigi case, more properly known as Captiol Records v. ReDigi, Inc. was, in one sense, at least, not a big surprise. It was never very likely, given the trajectory of recent copyright jurisprudence, that the Second Circuit would uphold a digital first sale right, which is fundamentally what the case is about.
  • ReDigi and the Path Forward for Digital Exhaustion by Aaron Perzanowski, January 01, 2019. In December—more than a year after hearing oral arguments—the Second Circuit finally issued its opinion in Capitol Records v. ReDigi. The decision, written by Judge Pierre Leval, affirmed the district court’s holding that ReDigi infringed Capitol’s copyrights by operating a secondary market for used digital music files. Undoubtedly, the Second Circuit delivered a serious blow to the notion of digital exhaustion. ReDigi was, after all, the first U.S. test case for extending the exhaustion principle to digital goods. But in this post, I want to push back against a broad reading of ReDigi by first critiquing the Second Circuit’s analysis and second, by outlining a path forward hinted at by the decision’s conspicuously circumscribed reasoning.
  • The Implications of the ReDigi Decision for Libraries by Jonathan Band, December 21, 2018. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has finally issued its long-awaited decision in Capitol Records v. ReDigi. The Second Circuit affirmed the district court’s finding that the ReDigi service, which allowed the resale of iTunes files, infringed copyright. The Second Circuit’s reasoning clearly closes the door on the concept of digital first sale in a commercial setting. It also raises questions concerning the viability of Controlled Digital Lending (“CDL”) by libraries. Accordingly, CDL initiatives must be carefully reevaluated in light of this decision.
  • Controlled Digital Lending: Technology Solution or Legal Pathway? by Andy Wesolek and Ellen Ramsey, November 29, 2018. This month’s post is an interview-style discussion about Controlled Digital Lending, prompted by the recent post on the subject by Dave Hansen and Kyle K. Courtney on Duke University’s scholcomm blog.
  • Controlled Digital Lending Concept Gains Ground by Matt Enis, November 15, 2018. Copyright experts have begun building a framework for Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) with the recent publication of a white paper and an official position statement initially supported by 40 individual and 24 institutional signatories, including major academic and public library systems, library consortia such as Califa Group, legal scholars, and organizations such as the Internet Archive.
  • Wasted: A case study for controlled digital lending by Chris Freeland, November 13, 2018. The recent nomination and appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court offered a timely opportunity to demonstrate how controlled digital lending can be used by libraries to circulate digital copies of books that are out of print or not widely held.
  • Controlled Digital Lending by Sebastian Hammer, October 22, 2018. Last week, I attended the 2018 Open Libraries Forum at the Internet Archive’s remarkable headquarters in San Francisco. The focus of the Forum was twofold: to learn firsthand from some of the authors of the newly-minted position statement on controlled digital lending (CDL), and to help provide input for the Archive on their own Digital Lending platform, which precedes the Position Statement, but has the potential to be an important part of a global CDL infrastructure (with some caveats that I will return to).
  • Why Controlled Digital Lending Matters to Schools by Lisa Petrides, October 16, 2018. As an educator who has built a career around the research and practice of how the use of information and knowledge impacts continuous improvement in all aspects of education, I read with great interest the recent position statement on controlled digital lending written by copyright scholars and endorsed by a number of libraries and institutions across the country (including my organization, ISKME).
  • You Can Now Read Mark Judge’s Book Without Paying Almost $2,000. But Is the Online Copy Legal? by Jennifer Kang, October 05, 2018. The hottest book in the U.S. right now is almost impossible to get—and unusually so. It’s out of print, costs $1,849.99 on Amazon, and is “not even close to being a good book,” as the New York Times said in its review. But like with most books, you might now be able to get your hands on it at a digital library.
  • Thanks to the Boston Public Library, you can read Mark Judge’s book ‘Wasted’ online by Steve Annear, October 04, 2018. You no longer have to shell out nearly $2,000 to get a look at the book by the friend of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh — the one about teenage drinking and private school culture. And you have the Boston Public Library to thank.
  • Controlled Digital Lending of Library Books by Dave Hansen and Kyle K. Courtney, September 28, 2018. We’re very pleased to announce the release of two documents that we believe have the potential to help greatly expand digital access to print library collections by helping libraries do online what we have always done in print: lend books.
  • Authors Alliance Supports Controlled Digital Lending by Libraries by Authors Alliance, September 28, 2018. Today, Authors Alliance joins a group of organizations, including the Digital Public Library of America, Internet Archive, and UC Berkeley Library, to endorse the Position Statement on Controlled Digital Lending by Libraries.
  • UC Berkeley Library takes key step to expand digital access to its collections by Berkeley, September 28, 2018. The UC Berkeley Library took an important step forward today in improving widespread digital access to its vast collections.